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  1. Tips for Reducing, Managing Plantar Fasciitis Pain

    Studies show about three-quarters of all Americans will experience foot pain at some point in their lives. Of them, more than 2 million people who seek treatment each year will learn they suffer from an overuse condition called plantar fasciitis.

    Fortunately, most cases of plantar fasciitis are both manageable and treatable.

    Plantar fasciitis will typically present itself as sharp pain in the heel or in the arch of the foot, most often when you’re taking the first steps of the day. The pain is the result of your plantar fascia – the thick band of tissue connecting your heel to the ball of your foot – becoming inflamed due to overuse.

    The inflammation that causes plantar fasciitis can come from a sudden increase in activity levels (i.e., walking or running much longer distances) or from sports-related activities that require a lot of running and jumping. Other causes may include a lot of standing, walking or running on hard surfaces, not wearing shoes that properly support your foot type, or being overweight.

    It’s estimated plantar fasciitis affects about 10 percent of Americans at some point in their lives, with most being diagnosed after the age of 40.

    Plantar fasciitis pain may come and go for some without treatment, but we never recommend ignoring pain as this is your body’s way of telling you something’s wrong. Fortunately, there are some things you can do at home to help relieve the discomfort and hopefully keep the condition from getting worse.

    Tips for the at-home management of plantar fasciitis include:

    Rest: As with any overuse injury, rest is a key component of recovery. Decrease your distances when walking or running, and try to avoid hard surfaces.

    Stretching: Stretch the soles of your feet by gently pulling your big toe back toward your ankle and holding for 10 seconds at a time. Also, wrap a towel around the ball of your foot and, from a seated position with your heel to the floor, slowly pull your toes toward you, stretching the arch of your foot. As tight calves may also make you more susceptible to plantar fasciitis, regular calf stretches are a must.

    Massage: A tennis ball can do wonders as a massaging tool. Roll a tennis ball under the sole of your foot, applying weight as comfort allows. Rolling your foot over a frozen plastic water bottle can also work, with the added benefit of helping decrease pain and inflammation.

    Foot Support: When standing for long periods of time, stand on a thick, padded mat. And don’t take your shoes for granted. Make sure they offer good arch support and that you replace them immediately as the shock absorption begins to wear down.

    If pain persists, however, a more individualized treatment plan from a physical therapist is likely needed. A physical therapist can pinpoint the most likely triggers of your plantar fasciitis pain, then customize a treatment regimen that may include flexibility and strength exercises, footwear recommendations and/or custom shoe inserts, and the possible use of taping or splints to help maintain optimal ankle and toe positions.

  2. Tips for Keeping the Weekend Warrior Healthy, Injury Free

    A “weekend warrior” is someone who, due to the hectic nature of a typical workweek, opts to cram most of her or his exercise into weekend workouts, activities, games and/or competitions.

    And while most physical therapists would never fault anyone for getting exercise, most would also agree that weekend warriors should be particularly cautious as the sporadic nature of their workout schedule puts them at a greater risk of getting injured.

    Days of downtime followed by sudden bursts of activity over a day or two isn’t ideal, after all. By putting greater stress on the body over a shorter period of time, weekend warriors should be aware that they’re putting themselves at greater risk of acute injuries, such as strains, sprains or worse.

    That’s because inactivity throughout the week can lead to a general deconditioning of the body that may include muscle tightness and imbalances, along with reduced endurance and cardiovascular fitness. A more consistent workout schedule can combat such deconditioning.

    But if one truly does struggle to find time to achieve their expert-recommended 150 minutes of exercise each week without cramming them into just a couple of days, we offer to following tips for avoiding injury.

    Space It Out – Rather than packing your weekly exercise minutes into two back-to-back days at the end of the week, consider spacing these days out. This can help you avoid some of the deconditioning effects mentioned above.

    Warm Up, Cool Down – When the weekend arrives and it comes time to take the field, hit the trails or tee off for 18, always warm up first. Take 5 to 10 minutes for some light resistance and cardio exercises to get the blood flowing. And after you’re done, cool down with some stretching. Also, be sure to drink plenty of water throughout.

    Temper Your Intensity – When you’re packing your workouts into just a couple days a week, don’t overdo it. As you’re not exercising as consistently, stay on the safe side by pulling back slightly on your intensity.

    Mix It Up – Try not to fill your weekends with the same activities. Mix it up, perhaps focusing on cardio one weekend and strength another – or a variation thereof. This helps ensure your entire body remains balanced, reducing your chances of injury.

    Stay Active During the Week – Even if you don’t have time to hit the gym during the week, don’t use that as an excuse to be completely sedentary. Capitalize on brief moments during the week to move around, stretch, and maybe even do some exercising. Take the stairs, stretch during your breaks, stand at your desk, walk during meetings or after work, and maybe even fit 10 minutes of at-home resistance training into your evenings.

    Listen to Your Body – Always know your limits. And, if you feel aches and pains or suspect possible injury, stop exercising immediately and see a medical professional, such as a physical therapist. Don’t try to power through discomfort just so you can get through the weekend.

  3. Good Night’s Sleep Linked to Optimal Physical & Mental Health

    At a time when studies indicate people are getting increasingly less sleep, one thing remains clear: we need to take sleep much more seriously as it is critical to both health and healing.

    Those who don’t get enough sleep are prone to lots of health-related issues that can interfere with quality of life and even life expectancy. This can also interfere with healing, especially when regular exercise, rehab and visits to the physical therapist are necessary.

    Multiple studies show that people who struggle to get enough sleep at night are more susceptible to issues and conditions such as weight gain, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, a weakened immune system, and even anxiety and depression.

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the average adult requires between 7 to 9 hours of sleep every night. School-aged children 6 to 12 years old need 9 to 12 hours per night, while teens require 8 to 10 hours.

    However, when people wake up tired, then spend the rest of the day longing for a chance to take a nap, it goes without saying that they’re not getting enough sleep. Over time, one will likely find this lack of sleep begins to affect other areas of life, whether it’s mood or a lack of motivation and drive to get things done in their day-to-day activities.

    It can become a spiral if the lack of sleep is not remedied.

    Having trouble getting enough sleep at night? Consider the following tips:

    • Keep a Schedule: Maintain a regular bed and wake-up schedule, even on the weekends.
    • Be Relaxed: Establish a regular, relaxing bedtime routine such as soaking in a hot bath, reading a good book or listening to music.
    • Consider the Environment: Create a sleep-conducive environment – on a comfortable mattress – that’s quiet, dark, comfortable and cool.
    • Careful What You Consume: Have your last meal or snack 2 to 3 hours before bedtime, and avoid consuming caffeine, nicotine and alcohol shortly before you go to bed.
    • Cut Off Screen Time: Turn off all lit screens – smartphone, computer, TV, etc. – at least 30 minutes before lying down.
    • Exercise Regularly: It’s no coincidence that people who exercise regularly or who spend their days more physically active often report better sleep than those who are more sedentary.

    Physical therapists like to use the phrase, “movement is medicine,” and exercising for better sleep is one of many examples where this often holds true. Just be sure to complete your exercise regimen a few hours before bedtime.

  4. 5 Exercise Myths for People 55 and Older

    While it’s expected that most older people tend to slow down with age, the notion that seniors and soon-to-be seniors should trade in exercise and their active lifestyles for bingo and rocking chairs is definitely antiquated, say physical therapists.

    And yet, when it comes to exercise for the 55-and-older population, plenty of myths continue to drive people’s actions – or rather, inactions – when it comes to putting in the right amount of sweat equity to stay healthy and active.

    From a physiological perspective, sure, most people are going to start to slow down in various ways as they get older, but that doesn’t mean seniors and soon-to-be seniors should lean into these so-called consequences of aging. Age is just a number, they say. And while one must be mindful about the ways in which they adapt activities to certain age-related limitations, regular exercise remains just as critical later in life as at any other point.

    To help encourage the 55-and-older crowd to continue making exercise a standard aspect of their everyday lives, here is a list of the top five exercise myths when it comes to fitness at an advanced age:

    Myth 1: “It’s Too Late to Start” – It doesn’t matter what you’ve done before now. Even if you’ve never had a regular exercise routine before, it’s never too late to start. “Better late than never” when it comes to exercise isn’t just an adage; it’s a statement backed by multiple studies. Exercising later in life can lower your risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and some types of cancer.

    Myth 2: “My Body’s Too Frail” (aka, “I Might Break a Hip”) – Unless you’ve been told this by a medical professional (i.e., physician or physical therapist) based on a specific condition or injury, this is likely fear talking. Not only does regular exercise help strengthen your body’s stability, balance and flexibility, reducing the chances of a fall, but it can also help strengthen your bones. (More on that later.)

    Myth 3: “I Have Joint Pain, so I Should Stay Away from Exercise” – Again, the opposite is true. According to medical research, it’s crucial people with arthritis partake in regular exercise. Not only does it improve strength and flexibility, but exercise can also reduce joint stiffness and pain while helping sufferers ward off fatigue.

    Myth 4: “I’m Too Old for Weight Training” – Weight training, also known as resistance and strength training, actually takes on a more critical role as you age. Studies show that not only does a stronger body help seniors stay upright and confident, but weight-bearing exercise can also ward off the onset of osteoporosis by helping maintain bone density.

    Myth 5: “I’m Better Off Focusing on My Mind, Not My Body” – Fact is, focusing on the body is focusing on the mind. According to multiple studies, including one published last month in Nature Medicine, exercise improves brain health, helps ward off dementia, and may even slow the progression of dementia. In addition, exercise reduces stress and anxiety, and staying active often equates to a better social life.

    According to 2018 physical guidelines by the U.S. Department of Health, older adults should shoot for 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity each week, plus weekly balance and muscle strengthening exercises.

    And while fitness levels and certain limitations shouldn’t keep most older adults from exercise, some exercises may require modifications based on such conditions. Fortunately, a physical therapist can provide personalized guidance based on individual health conditions, movement limitations and physician recommendations.

     

  5. 5 Fitness Tips to Keep Introverts Moving

    If you have a more introverted personality, joining a gym, exercise class or workout group may not be your cup of tea. But, that doesn’t have to hold you back from achieving fitness or weight-loss goals.

    Finding a workout routine that fits your personality is one of the key ways to achieve optimal results. And, that holds particularly true for introverts – those who may be uneasy about joining a gym or a fitness class due to crowds of people, loud music, or the seemingly prying eyes of other members.

    It’s been estimated that one-third or more of the U.S. population falls at least partially into the category of “introverts.” This doesn’t necessarily equate to shyness, however.

    An introvert is more likely to find many social or group interactions draining. In contrast, they are generally more stimulated and energized by personal or alone time.

    If you’re an introvert looking for a little more personal comfort and stimulation when workout out, consider the following advice to help you achieve your fitness goals:

    1. Exercise Solo: If you’re more comfortable by yourself or just don’t feel like dealing with crowds of people at the gym, simply consider fitness options you can do on your own – options like running, swimming, cycling or going for a walk. As exercise itself is energizing, so too is alone time for an introvert’s spirit.
    2. Use the Buddy System: A misconception about introverts is they always prefer being alone. The truth is, introverts enjoy spending quality time with close friends, and this can be beneficial when exploring various fitness options. Bringing a buddy to the gym or a fitness class can make the experience much more positive than going alone.
    3. Seek Inner Focus: Introverts are known for “living in their heads,” so to speak, and often this breeds a level of creativity and personal reflection they find stimulating. So, consider types of exercises known for benefiting the body as well as the inner spirit – activities like yoga, Pilates, tai chi, stretching, deep breathing, etc.
    4. Arm Yourself with Headphones: Sometimes, you just can’t beat access to the space and equipment a fitness club can provide. So, if you just can’t turn your back on the gym, make the experience easier with a good set of headphones. Not only can you choose your own audio motivators (i.e., music, podcasts, books, etc.), but simply wearing headphones can help ward off unwanted conversation.
    5. Stream at Home: Streaming at-home fitness apps have come a long way over the last couple of years. Services like Peloton, Aaptiv, ClassPass, etc., offer professional-level streaming workout programs (and equipment, in some cases) for at-home fitness.

    With all at-home workout programs, however, use caution. While some at-home programs can be good, they can’t provide immediate feedback about incorrect form, movement deficiencies and weaknesses in strength and flexibility that, over time, can lead to discomfort, pain or injury.

    Consider consulting a physical therapist prior to starting a particular plan to ensure it’s not only safe, but also aligns with your goals and fitness level.

  6. Strength Training Critical for Active, Independent Aging

    To the 43 million Americans who have low bone density, putting them at high risk of osteoporosis, physical therapists have an important message: exercise is good medicine. But not just any exercise – weight-bearing, muscle-strengthening exercise.

    “Essential to staying strong and vital during older adulthood is participation in regular strengthening exercises, which help prevent osteoporosis and frailty by stimulating the growth of muscle and bone,” said David Satcher, M.D., Ph.D., U.S. Surgeon General from 1998 to 2002. “Strength training exercises are easy to learn, and have been proven safe and effective through years of thorough research.”

    And while this benefit of strength training for older adults is a powerful one, it’s simply just one in a list of proven reasons why seniors should make strength training a part of their lifestyles and fitness regimens.

    While a reduction in strength is often considered an inevitable part of getting older, people of all ages should feel empowered to take charge of their overall health (including strength training) as they age.

    Along with diet and regular check-ups with both a physician and a physical therapist, an exercise regimen that includes elements of strength and resistance training can help slow some of the effects of aging – this, while also allowing one to maintain a high quality of life through activity and independence.

    “The work of scientists, health professionals, and older adult volunteers has greatly increased our knowledge about the aging process and how we can maintain strength, dignity and independence as we age,” Satcher said.

    According to reams of medical research, the many proven benefits of weight-bearing and resistance exercise include:

    Rebuilding Muscle: People do lose muscle mass as they age, but much of this can be slowed and even reversed through strength and resistance exercise. And of course, a stronger body has a direct impact on issues related to balance, fall prevention and independence.

    Reducing Fat: We also tend to more easily put on weight as we get older. Studies show, however, that while older adults gain muscle mass through strength training, they also experience a reduction in body fat.

    Reducing Blood Pressure: Studies have also shown that strength training is a great (and natural) way to reduce one’s blood pressure, even for those who “can’t tolerate or don’t respond well to standard medications.”

    Improving Cholesterol Levels: Strength training can actual help improve the level of HDL (“good”) cholesterol in the body by up to 21 percent, while also helping to reduce to levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol.

    Strengthening Mental Health: This goes with all exercise, including strength training. Maintaining a high level of fitness can combat anxiety, depression, issues with stress, etc. Exercise is also great for memory!

    Whether walking, jogging, hiking, dancing, etc., experts recommend 30 minutes of weight-bearing activity every day. Guidelines also suggest it’s also necessary to set aside another two to three days of strength and resistance training each week, which can include free weights, weight machines, Pilates, yoga, and so on.

    And for the sake of both health and safety, a thorough strength, movement and balance assessment should precede any new exercise regimen, especially for older adults – assessments that physical therapists are uniquely qualified to perform.

     

Smokey Point

Hours:
Monday-Friday: 7:00 am – 1:00pm; 2:00pm – 6:00pm

Services

  • Physical Therapy services
  • Aquatic Therapy
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Medicine
  • Concussion Rehabilitation
  • Gait Analysis

 

  • Balance Rehabilitation
  • Work Injury Management
  • TMJ Treatment
  • Massage Therapy
  • Motor Vehicle Accident Rehabilitation

Mark Roberts, DPT, COMT
Clinic Director

Why I’m a Physical Therapist: I’ve always been mechanically inclined and enjoy helping people. Physical therapy allows me to help others while doing what I love.
Education Commitment: I am interested in continuing to develop my manual therapy skills and obtain a certification in orthopedic manual therapy (COMT).
Personal Interests: I love being in the mountains either exploring trails on my mountain bike or chasing powder on my snowboard.
Educational Background: I attended Western Washington University in Bellingham and earned a B.S. in Kinesiology. After taking a year off to work as a physical therapist aide, I attended Physical Therapy school at Regis University in Denver, Colorado.

Heather Wharton, PT, DPT

Why I’m a Physical Therapist: I am passionate about helping others regain or improve their physical capabilities to return to doing the activities they enjoy.
Continuing Education Commitment: I am committed to lifelong learning with a special interest in manual therapy. I am certified in myofascial decompression with the use of negative pressure and am working towards a Certification in Orthopedic Manual Therapy through the Ola Grismby Institute.
Personal Interests: I love all things sports related and I am a Notre Dame fanatic. I like to golf, hike, paddle board, and travel the world in my free time.
Educational Background: I received a B.A. in Biology at Drury University in 2014 and a Doctorate of Physical Therapy degree from Southwest Baptist University in 2017.

John Richter, Massage Therapist

Why I’m a Massage Therapist: I discovered massage therapy after running a sub 2:30 marathon. Massage has many benefits for all different needs.
Continuing Education Commitment: I have extensive experience working with patients recovering from orthopedic injuries, spinal cord injuries and lymphedema. I also enjoy working with student athletes and older patients. I have worked as a Physical Therapy Aide in both inpatient and outpatient environments since 1990.
Personal Interests: I am a cancer survivor. I have competed at the national level as a marathon runner, achieving sub 2 hour and 30-minute times. I am also proud to be a father of two adult children, J. Michael and Alyssa.
Educational Background: I graduated from the Seattle Massage School in 1993. From 1993 to 2006 I taught Kinesiology at Ashmead College.

Patty Boettcher, PTA

Why I’m a Physical Therapist Assistant: I met a therapist when I was in high school and he was so dynamic and compassionate about his career, that I volunteered in his clinic and the rest is history.
Continuing Education Commitment: I have taken a wide variety of classes over the years to expand my knowledge base and usually with a certain patient in mind.
Personal Interests: I have a 30acre farm, 2 grown children, no grandchildren and am president of the board at my local museum.
Educational Background: I graduated from the PTA program at Green River Community College in 1980.

Justin Hicks, PTA

Why I’m a Physical Therapist Assistant: Growing up watching and playing sports, I have always been fascinated by how the human body works. I also just enjoy people. Physical therapy allows me to pursue my passion while helping those return to life and function.
Continuing Education Commitment: I feel it’s important to never settle and stop learning. I try to learn new ways to do things from each therapist I work with. I hope to get the opportunity to explore Neurokinetic Therapy and the Fascial Distortion Model in the near future.
Personal Interests: I commit majority of my free time raising 3 boys along side my wife, Rachel. We try to be active with water activities, hikes, and trips to the park especially when the weather is good. When I can escape, I like to play golf, catch a game, bbq, and hang with some friends.
Educational Background: I grew up locally and attended high school in Lake Stevens. I earned a BS in Kinesiology from Washington State University. Go Cougs!! I graduated from the Physical Therapist Assistant program at Whatcom CC in Bellingham in 2009.

Sabrina Lloyd, PT Aide

Heather Davidson, PSR

Ana Linares, PSR

Silver Lake

Hours:
Monday, Wednesday: 6:30am – 7:00pm
Tuesday, Thursday: 7:00am – 7:00pm
Friday: 6:30am – 6:00pm

Services

  • Physical Therapy services
  • Hand Therapy
  • Custom Hand Splints & Orthotics
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Medicine
  • Custom Orthotics & Gait Analysis
 

  • Balance Rehabilitation
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Work Injury Management
  • TMJ Treatment
  • Headaches/Chronic Pain

Jeff Kriegel, DPT, CMPT, CSCS, Clinic Director

Jeff has been practicing physical therapy with Cascade Rehab since graduating from the University of Puget Sound in 2000. Over the last 17 years, he has obtained his Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist credential thru the NSCA and his Certified Manual Physical Therapist designation thru the North American Institute of Orthopedic Manual Therapy. Jeff is a clinical instructor, assisting in the education process for many new therapists and exercise physiologists over the years. He has volunteered his time for event coverage with Mariner and Cascade High Schools. He also served as the team physical therapist for the Everett Aquasox prior the birth of his two children. Jeff has a long history of treating spine and extremity injuries in the Everett area. He believes in empowering patients through education on their condition and the rehabilitation process to ensure the best outcomes. In his spare time, Jeff enjoys woodworking, watching/coaching his two girl’s sports, camping and hiking with the whole family, and rooting on the Huskies!

Janet Fowler, MPT, CMPT

Janet has been practicing physical therapy for over 19 years in an outpatient orthopedic setting, the last 13 years at Cascade Rehab. She graduated from the Eastern Washington University with a Master’s Degree in physical therapy and went on to obtain certifications in manual therapy and vestibular rehabilitation. She recently started courses in craniosacral therapy and is pursuing certification. In her spare time, Janet tries to keep up with her two young boys, enjoys watching movies with her husband, and indulges in good chocolate.

Christy Green, OTR/L, CHT

Christy grew up in the Puget Sound area and received her bachelors of science in occupational therapy from The University of Puget Sound in 2000. She started her occupational therapy career in the United States Army, serving on active duty for four years at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. While in the Army, she earned a special designation as an Upper Extremity Neuromusculoskeletal Evaluator. She then relocated to Washington State and has been working at Cascade Rehabilitation since 2004. Christy earned the distinguished designation as a Certified Hand Therapist in 2007. Since then she has continued to advance her clinical skills by attending advanced hand training seminars and with regular review of current peer reviewed literature. She is an active member of the American Society of Hand Therapists. In addition to spending time with her husband and three children, Christy enjoys singing with her church’s worship team and with the Mill Creek Chorale.

Andrew Amirr, PTA

Andrew has been a Physical Therapist Assistant since 2010. Including five years at Cascade Rehabilitation in Silver Lake. He graduated from Pima Medical Institute’s PTA program in 2009 and went on to obtain certifications in Applied Functional Science and Kinesio Taping, to name a few. In his spare time, Andrew is a self-proclaimed “gym rat,” with a passion for the sport of bodybuilding, but his absolute favorite thing to do is spending time with his wife and two children.

Emily Damon, OTA

Emily graduated Magna Cum Laude from Lake Washington Institute of Technology in 2017 with dual degrees in both Occupational Therapy Assistant and Social Human Services. She also holds a Bachelor of Music degree from Central Washington University. She was introduced to hand therapy through one of her clinical rotations and discovered that she has a passion for helping people return to their activities of daily living with what she believes is one of the most utilized parts of the human body. She hopes to further her education and specialization of hand therapy to include the use of cupping, lymphedema training, cold laser treatment and neurological rehabilitation. In her spare time, she enjoys binge watching West Wing and spending time with her husband, 3 kids and pets at home.

Linda Shuger, LMP

Graduated from Seattle Massage School and became licensed in 1994. I’ve been with Cascade Rehab at their Colby, Harbour Pt., and Silverlake locations since 1998. Started in the PT department and soon moved over to OT/Hand Therapy full time. OT allowed me to use my massage skills daily which I am thankful for and enjoy very much. I’ve worked with the best hand therapists over the years and I’ve learned so much from all of them! My non-work time is dedicated to my family, my 2 cats Joey and Gabby, animal activism, music, whale watching, beach time at Picnic Pt., and naps.

Devin Jacques, MS, OTR/L, CHT

Devin Jacques was born and raised in Phoenix, Arizona. He received his Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology from Arizona State University in 2008. He then attended occupational therapy school at Midwestern University in Glendale, Arizona where he received his Master’s in Occupational Therapy in 2011. It was at Midwestern University where Devin began to develop his passion for treating the upper extremity. Devin has worked as an occupational therapist for the last 7 years in Phoenix, Arizona, Green Bay, Wisconsin, and most recently in Denver, Colorado. He has spent the last 6 years as a hand therapist and received his CHT (Certified Hand Therapist) certification from the Hand Therapy Certification Commission in November 2017. He is an active member of the American Society of Hand Therapists (ASHT) as well. Devin specializes in the treatment of various orthopedic conditions of the hand, wrist, elbow, and shoulder including custom orthotic fabrication for the hand, wrist and elbow. He provides current evidence-based treatments, focusing on providing quality and individualized treatments for his patients. Devin continues to grow as a hand therapist working towards his certification in orthopedic manual therapy (COMT) for the upper extremity. Devin has recently moved from Denver, CO to Whidbey Island with his wife Jenna to be closer to family and to reap all the benefits of living in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. When he is not at work, Devin loves to ski, hike, and golf as well as spend time with his wife and their boxer, Charles.

Dave Cagle

Bio Coming Soon.

 

 

 

Denise Blackwell, PT

Bio Coming Soon.

 

 

 

Bryon Flett, DPT

Bio Coming Soon.

 

 

 

 

Mount Vernon

Hours:
Monday-Friday: 7:00am-6:00pm

Services

  • Physical Therapy services
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Medicine
  • Custom Orthotics & Gait Analysis
 

  • Balance Rehabilitation
  • Work Injury Management
  • TMJ Treatment
  • Headaches

Matthew Bergen, PT, DPT, Clinic Director

Matthew joined our area from Savannah, GA, and graduated with a doctorate in Physical Therapy from Mercer University in Atlanta, GA, in 2016.  A former paramedic and firefighter, his experience has allowed him to provide therapy to critically ill patients as well as work fluidly in an outpatient capacity with injuries ranging from sports-related to that of the field worker.  Prior to that, he obtained a bachelor’s degree in Spanish from Furman University and spent nearly 3 years working for the United States Peace Corps with their agricultural program in Nicaragua. His involvement in sports throughout his youth and in adulthood paved a clear path for him to eventually pursue physical therapy. He particularly enjoys the various challenges that his job brings, and gets great satisfaction in seeing patients make positive change in various aspects of life that accompany improvement with physical mobility. He enjoys the outdoors and the adventure it brings, from hiking, to mountain biking, backpacking, and camping. He and his wife try to commit to at least one annual triathlon to keep a physical goal set, and he enjoys working with patients and creating personal goals to work towards in a similar aspect. He loves going by the motto that the best move is the next move, and looks to instill this in his patient care.

Jordan Heisler, PTA

Jordan graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Kinesiology and Minor in Media Analysis from Arizona State University in 2011. He then obtained his Physical Therapist Assistant degree from Whatcom Community College in 2016. Jordan was introduced to the field of physical therapy for the first time as a high school athlete. Even though it wasn’t always fun, the overall experience was quite positive which is what prompted him to pursue a career path as a PTA. Jordan loves this field of work because he gets to interact and build rapport with a very diverse population. He believes the best part of his job is being involved in a patient’s road to recovery (working closely with each person to help maximize their potential) so that they can achieve both their short and long-term goals. He has been a big Seattle sports fan since childhood. In addition to his passion for the Seahawks and Mariners, Jordan is a big advocate of bringing the Sonics back to Seattle. He also loves to travel – whether it’s visiting family in different parts of the country or flying to watch the Seahawks play on the road. In his spare time, you can find Jordan in the kitchen cooking, barbecuing outside on the grill, shooting hoops, attending sporting events, playing Madden on Xbox, or hanging out with friends.

 

Harbour Pointe

Hours:
Monday, Wednesday: 7:00am-6:00pm
Tuesday, Thursday: 6:30am-7:00pm
Friday: 7:00am-5:00pm

Services

  • Physical Therapy services
  • Hand Therapy
  • Custom Hand Splints & Orthotics
  • Spine Rehabilitation and Extremities
  • Sports Medicine
  • Running Rehabilitation Program
 

  • Balance Rehabilitation
  • Work Injury Management
  • TMJ Treatment
  • Headaches
  • Chronic/Persistent pain

Dale Hoistad, PT, CMPT, CHP, FAAOMPT, Clinic Director

Dale has been practicing in the Mukilteo/Everett area for 30 years. He has completed 3 long-term post graduate certifications beginning with a year-long Fellowship Residency in the San Francisco Bay Area. He then went on to complete a long-term Hellerwork Training program which includes manual treatment of the myofascial system. The latest certification was a Level III proficiency through The North American Institute of Manual Therapy and he’s currently focusing on additional courses from the Institute of Physical Art. Dale is a Lifetime Fellow in the American Academy of Manual Physical Therapy. In his free time, he enjoys tennis, bicycling, hiking/backpacking and trying to keep up with his wife and teenage children.

Robert C. Rinke, PT, DC, FAAOMPT

Robert practices as a physical therapist and Doctor of Chiropractic. He received his Masters degree in Physical Therapy from the University of Southern California and Doctorate in Chiropractic from Palmer College of Chiropractic-West. He also earned a Bachelors degree in Sociology and a Masters degree in Kinesiology from the University of Washington. Dr. Rinke’s training includes the six-month Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) residency at Kaiser Foundation Rehabilitation Center, Vallejo, CA, the Folsom Physical Therapy Orthopedic Manual Therapy (OMT) Residency, Folsom, CA, and Palmer College of Chiropractic-West, San Jose, CA. In 1991 Dr. Rinke passed the final examination in the Kaltenborn-Evjenth Nordic System for Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapist (OMPT) according to the International Federation of Orthopedic Manipulative Therapists (IFOMT) standards. In 1994 Dr. Rinke was named one of the first full Fellows in the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists (FAAOMPT) and is now a lifetime Fellow. Dr. Rinke has taught short courses in PNF and OMT since 1986.

Natalie B. Lew, PT

Natalie earned her physical therapy degree at California State University, Northridge in 1981. Ms. Lew completed the three-month residency program in Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) at Kaiser Foundation Rehabilitation in Vallejo, CA in 1982 and emphasized treating neurological rehab patients early in her career. In 1984 she became interested in Orthopedic Manual Therapy (OMT) and moved to the Sacramento, CA area to further her training. Ms. Lew successfully completed the year-long Folsom Physical Therapy Orthopedic Manual Therapy (OMT) Program in 1987, and repeated it in residency in 1988 while working in the area as Orthopedic Clinical Specialist at an area hospital outpatient clinic. She has taught short courses in PNF since 1984, and OMT since 1990.

Devin Jacques, MS, OTR/L, CHT

Devin Jacques was born and raised in Phoenix, Arizona. He received his Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology from Arizona State University in 2008. He then attended occupational therapy school at Midwestern University in Glendale, Arizona where he received his Master’s in Occupational Therapy in 2011. It was at Midwestern University where Devin began to develop his passion for treating the upper extremity. Devin has worked as an occupational therapist for the last 7 years in Phoenix, Arizona, Green Bay, Wisconsin, and most recently in Denver, Colorado. He has spent the last 6 years as a hand therapist and received his CHT (Certified Hand Therapist) certification from the Hand Therapy Certification Commission in November 2017. He is an active member of the American Society of Hand Therapists (ASHT) as well. Devin specializes in the treatment of various orthopedic conditions of the hand, wrist, elbow, and shoulder including custom orthotic fabrication for the hand, wrist and elbow. He provides current evidence-based treatments, focusing on providing quality and individualized treatments for his patients. Devin continues to grow as a hand therapist working towards his certification in orthopedic manual therapy (COMT) for the upper extremity. Devin has recently moved from Denver, CO to Whidbey Island with his wife Jenna to be closer to family and to reap all the benefits of living in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. When he is not at work, Devin loves to ski, hike, and golf as well as spend time with his wife and their boxer, Charles.

Elizabeth Peterson, DPT

Liz has been with Cascade since graduating from the University of Puget Sound with a doctorate in physical therapy. She enjoys working with patients of all backgrounds, using manual therapy and exercise prescription to help them return to the activities that matter most to them. Prior to becoming a physical therapist she was a cycling coach, and she enjoys teaching and empowering patients to reach their personal goals. She is currently pursuing a certification in Orthopedic Manual Therapy. In her spare time she is an avid runner, cyclist, and climber.

Hailey Garcia, PTA

Hailey has been practicing as a Physical Therapist Assistant since 2014 after graduating Pima Medical Institute’s Physical Therapist Assistant program in Seattle, WA. Since graduation she has spent her time practicing in an outpatient orthopedic setting and continuing her education through mentorship programs. In 2017 she became a Certified Kinesio Taping Practitioner. She was also recognized through the APTA for attaining the PTA Advanced Proficiency of Orthopedics Certification after a year of course work, testing and clinical mentorship. When not at work Hailey spends time with her husband and son enjoying all that the beautiful PNW has to offer.

 

Everett/Broadway

Hours:
Monday-Friday: 7:00am- 6:00pm

Services

  • Physical Therapy Services
  • Aquatic Therapy
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Medicine
  • Hellerwork
  • Custom Orthotics & Gait Analysis
 

  • Balance Rehabilitation
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Work Injury Management
  • TMJ Treatment
  • Headaches
  • Chronic Pain

Nick Carter, PT, DPT, Clinic Director

Why I’m a Physical Therapist: I knew early on I wanted to be a physical therapist when I began having chronic ankle sprains and started going to PT myself. MY PT made a big impact on my life and helped me to gain stability and strength that propelled me to greater heights in my sports. The ability to impact people’s lives in a positive way and allow them to achieve their personal goals has continued to push me to be a better physical therapist.
Continuing Education Commitment: My continuing education interests include completing a fellowship in manual therapy. I am also pursuing certification in additional spinal techniques for the state of Washington. I believe in continuously expanding my knowledge to include new research, and to prevent an atrophied mind. The stagnant mind gets left behind.
Personal Interests: My personal interests are varied including playing and watching sports, reading, hiking, swimming, hunting, fishing, television, and most importantly, spending time with friends and family.
Educational Background: I graduated from WSU Vancouver with honors and earned a B.S. in Biology. I then completed my DPT at Eastern Washington University.

Patrick McKilligan, PT

Patrick is originally from Vancouver, Canada. He received his B.S. from University of Puget Sound. He specializes in treating the spine, low back, sacroiliac joints and the neck. Patrick is a dedicated runner and enjoys gardening.

 

Kirsti Griffin, PT

Kirsti is originally from Portland, Oregon and she obtained her Physical Therapy Degree from the University of Washington. She has been practicing Physical Therapy in an Everett orthopedic outpatient clinic for over 25 years. Kirsti enjoys working with all patients and feels fortunate to learn something new on a daily basis. She strives to help her patients optimize their functional rehabilitation potential through her manual skills and exercise prescription. She has co-developed Cascade’s aquatic therapy program which continues to grow and serve her diverse patient population. Away from the clinic, she can be found outside. She loves to run and walk through the neighborhood, cheer for her daughters and enjoy the Pacific Northwest waters boating with her husband.

Rebekah Reed, PTA, ATRIC

Bekah was born and raised in the Pacific Northwest. She obtained her Associates degree from PIMA Medical Institute in Seattle. She has since been certified in Aquatic Therapy. She is passionate about helping patients achieve their goals in an aquatic setting. In her spare time Bekah enjoys kayaking and spending time with her husband and 1-year old son.

Lauren Cronin, PT

Bio Coming Soon…

 

 

 

Kylee Hilde, PTA

Bio Coming Soon…