Category Archives: Physical Therapy

  1. Can Exercise Ward Off Cold and Flu Symptoms?

    As cold and flu season approaches, so does the season of illness prevention.

    From getting flu shots to adding a little extra Vitamin C to our diets, prevention often becomes a focus for those concerned with getting sick, missing work and/or school, and optimizing the joy of their upcoming Holiday Seasons.

    It’s based on this mindset that medical professionals such as physical therapists are most likely to get some version of the question: Can exercise boost my immune system?

    The answer, however, is broader than the question itself.

    Boosting the Immune System

    On a more general level, healthy living is the true key to building and maintaining a strong immune system. Habits like eating right, staying hydrated, getting plenty of sleep, and reducing stress account for some long-lasting, immune-boosting benefits.

    But, regular exercise definitely plays an important role, as well.

    Some studies have shown, for instance, that exercise on its own can play a role in reducing the length and intensity of colds and flu. Such research often points to many of the benefits inherent in regular fitness routines as factors that also help ward off illness:

    • Weight management
    • Lower blood pressure
    • Reduction in stress
    • Improved circulation

    Other studies have concluded that regular, mild-intensity exercise can help reduce illness while prolonged, high-intensity exercise can have the opposite effect by making one more susceptible to catching a bug.

    Based on this, if you feel you may be catching something – a cold, a flu or whatever may be going around – the best initial advice is to pull back on the length and intensity of their exercise routine just to be on the safe side.

    Keep getting your exercise, but also take greater care to make sure you’re staying hydrated, eating well and giving your body time to recover.

    If you do get sick?

    According to advice from the Mayo Clinic, that doesn’t necessarily mean you can’t continue to exercise. They offer the following two rules of thumb:

    The Neck Rule

    If you catch a cold and find that all the symptoms are concentrated above the neck (i.e., nasal congestion, runny nose, sneezing and/or a minor sore throat), it’s typically OK to exercise. Simply reduce your intensity. Instead of going for a jog, for instance, opt to go for a walk.

    In contrast, if you find that you’re experiencing symptoms below the neck – things like a congested chest, a hacking cough or an upset stomach – it’s best to not exercise at all.

    The Fever Rule

    Also, if you have a fever or are experience muscle aches and fatigue throughout your body, take a break from exercising. Instead, get some rest, stay hydrated and, if things don’t improve over a couple of days, visit your doctor.

    The bottom line: it’s always your best bet to listen to your body, and don’t overdo it. Pushing your body too hard when it’s fighting an illness could potentially do you more harm than good.

  2. I Stand Corrected! 5 Common Fitness Myths

    When only one in three adults get the recommended amount of physical activity their bodies need each week (according to the President’s Council on Sports, Fitness & Nutrition), it’s difficult for we as physical therapists to find fault when an individual is making an effort to exercise … even if the effort’s slightly misguided.

    But since October is National Physical Therapy Month, and physical therapists are the medical community’s preeminent experts in movement, fitness, and musculoskeletal function and injury, we view this month as an opportune time to correct what we see as a few common misconceptions about exercise.

    Good Intentions

    Some of the more common personal goals people make revolve around health, fitness and weight loss, and we as physical therapists are dedicated to supporting these goals through a number of individualized services.

    In doing so, though, it’s important to us that people work toward these objectives in a safe and healthful manner – one which most efficiently moves them toward their goals.

    In this spirit, here are five exercise myths we finds to be common among many fitness-minded people:

    1) Stretching Before Exercise Prevents Injuries

    Perhaps surprisingly, research suggests there’s no connection between pre-workout stretching and injury prevention. In addition, stretching before an activity or competition can actually weaken performance.

    So instead, warm up dynamically before a workout by walking, jogging, doing lunges and leg/arm swings, etc.

    Stretching is still incredibly important, but do your stretches independent of your workouts.

    2) The More, the Better

    For the more goal-driven crowd, a pedal-to-the-metal approach to fitness can seem the quickest and most efficient way to better health.

    However, it’s critical workout intensity and length remain in line with one’s current fitness levels and limits.

    It’s also important to schedule recovery, or off-days, into your routine. Failing to do so can increase your injury risk as well as the risk of burnout.

    3) Cross Training is for Athletes Only

    Cross training is simply working activities into your regimen that differ from your preferred or usual activities. The goal is to improve your overall fitness level by challenging your cardio, strength and balance in different ways.

    Such “training diversification” will help maximize your workout potential while helping to prevent overuse injuries and burnout, so everyone should do it.

    4) Aerobic is More Important Than Strength Training

    Whether it’s because some are concerned about too much “bulking up” or they feel spending their limited time on ellipticals and stationary bikes will maximize their efforts, cardio is often a focus for those seeking to improve health.

    It shouldn’t be the only focus, however.

    Muscular fitness is just as important as cardio for such issues as weight management, bone health, injury prevention, and so on.

    5) If Sore or Injured, Rest is Always Best

    Wrong again.

    While rest has a long history as a go-to response to soreness, pain and injury, research now suggests movement and “active recovery” can actually speed up the healing process, specifically when guided by a physical therapist.

    If pain or injury is keeping you from getting a full dose of exercise and physical activity each week, visit a physical therapist.

    Highly educated and licensed health care professionals, physical therapists like those at our clinic are experts at helping people reduce pain, improve/restore mobility, and ultimately lead more healthful, active lives.

  3. 5 Exercises for Improving Balance & Preventing Falls

    When we’re young, falls are treated as teaching opportunities. “Get back on your feet, brush yourself off and keep moving toward your goals,” we were told.

    But as we age, falls take on a much greater significance. When someone of advanced age falls, they tend to suffer greater distress to their health as well as their pocketbooks.

    In other words, a fall can greatly impact a senior’s ability to live an active, healthful and independent life. In fact, where older adults are concerned, a fall can have a spiraling effect on their overall quality of life during years typically set aside for much-deserved rest, relaxation and fun.

    Unfortunately, though, falls are an epidemic among seniors in the U.S.

    The Fall Epidemic

    According to the National Council on Aging, an older adult is treated for a fall in a U.S. emergency room every 11 seconds, making it the most common cause for nonfatal, trauma-related hospital admissions among this group.

    In addition, the average health care cost for each of these falls is approximately $35,000 per patient.

    Older bodies are simply more susceptible to serious injury when falls occur. And, while there are some things seniors can do to keep their bonds strong and flexible enough to better absorb a fall, the best course of action is to just prevent falls from happening to begin with.

    This starts with improving balance.

    Balance Exercises

    Like strength and cardiovascular conditioning, balance is something that can and should be improved through regular exercise. With this in mind, try these five exercises to help improve your balance:

    Standing March: As the name says, march in place for up to 30 seconds, slowly raising and lowering your knees throughout. Vary the surface on which you march (i.e., hard floor to the back yard) for more of a challenge.

    Heel to Toe: Starting with both heels touching the wall, put one foot in front of the other so the heel touches the toes of the opposite foot. Repeat with the other foot, as if you’re walking a chalk line. Go for 20 steps each round.

    Weight Shifts: With your feet hip-width apart, shift your weight to one side, lifting your other foot off the floor just a few inches. Hold this pose for up to 30 seconds, then shift and hold on the other leg. Increase reps per your ability.

    Single-Leg Balance: Starting with the same stance as above, now left one leg from the floor, banding it back at the knee. Hold for up to 30 seconds, then do the same with the other leg. Increase reps as your balance improves.

    Tai Chi/Yoga: If you feel your balance is strong and you’ve mastered the above exercises, trying a group Tai Chi or yoga class. Such classes are ideal for exercising balance by strengthening your body and core.

    Safety & Physical Therapy

    If you’re new to any of these exercises, help balance yourself initially by leaning on a table, chair back or wall for safety’s sake. Also, make these simple exercises part of your daily routine.

    And, if you’re a senior or soon-to-be senior who doesn’t currently exercise regularly, it’s smart to start any new fall-prevention effort by first getting a balance assessment from a physical therapist.

    Through a balance assessment, a physical therapist can determine your level of functional balance while pinpointing areas of concern that can be addressed through an individualized fall-prevention regimen.

  4. 6 Common Back Pain Myths, Debunked

    Despite being one of the top causes of disability in the U.S., affecting around eight in 10 people in their lifetimes, back pain is an ailment often misunderstood by those affected.

    Such misconceptions can cause those suffering from back pain to seek solutions, potential treatment paths, and even lifestyle alterations that aren’t necessarily in their best interests.

    Back pain can be as frustrating as it is debilitating, especially if past preventative measures and treatments haven’t been helpful. And, this can lead a person down paths that don’t result in the best and most necessary evidence-based treatments.

    These paths can sometimes lead to treatments that are more expensive or personally invasive – and perhaps even unnecessary – such as MRIs and surgery.

    MRIs, shots, surgery, medication, etc., should mostly be considered last resort-type solutions. The fact is, most back pain issues will go away on their own in a few days. And even when they don’t, most remaining cases can be successfully resolved through safer, more affordable and more effective treatment approaches.

    To help health care consumers make better decisions when considering solutions to their back-pain issues, we’d like to shed some light on the following common back pain myths:

    1. Bed Rest Helps with Relief & Healing: Once a common treatment for back pain, research strongly suggests long-term rest can slow recovery and even make your back pain worse. Instead, treatment involving movement and exercise (i.e., stretches, walking, swimming, etc.) often works better to hasten healing and provide relief.
    2. The Problem’s in My Spine: Back pain can be caused by a wide array of issues throughout the body as well as one’s environment. It can be a response to the way you move when you exercise, how you sit at work, the shoes you wear, the mattress on which you sleep, or simply your body compensating for movement limitations and weaknesses. Back pain doesn’t necessarily mean you have a “bad back,” or are predisposed to back pain.
    3. I Just Need an ‘Adjustment’: Those accustomed to visiting a chiropractor for back pain issues often claim to find relief from having their spine adjusted, or “cracked.” While this process can release endorphins that offer some temporary relief, only about 10 percent of all back pain cases can actually benefit from spine mobilization. Exercise is often more effective, as is determining and treating the pain’s source. (See item No. 2.)
    4. Medication’s the Answer: A popular quick fix, medication should never be viewed as a long-term solution to chronic back pain issues. Over-the-counter pain relievers can help get you through in the short term, but many prescription pain meds can be dangerous, addictive, and even make the pain worse in some instances.
    5. I’ll Probably Need Surgery: Of people experiencing low-back pain, only about 4 to 8 percent of their conditions can and should be successfully treated with surgery, according to the Cleveland Clinic. Even 90-plus percent of herniated discs often get better on their own through a combination of rest and physical therapy.
    6. I Need a Referral to See a Physical Therapist: Multiple studies have concluded that physical therapy is one of the safest and most effective ways to both treat and prevent back pain. And in nearly every state, patients can access physical therapy services without first getting a physician’s prescription.
  5. Tips for Reducing, Managing Plantar Fasciitis Pain

    Studies show about three-quarters of all Americans will experience foot pain at some point in their lives. Of them, more than 2 million people who seek treatment each year will learn they suffer from an overuse condition called plantar fasciitis.

    Fortunately, most cases of plantar fasciitis are both manageable and treatable.

    Plantar fasciitis will typically present itself as sharp pain in the heel or in the arch of the foot, most often when you’re taking the first steps of the day. The pain is the result of your plantar fascia – the thick band of tissue connecting your heel to the ball of your foot – becoming inflamed due to overuse.

    The inflammation that causes plantar fasciitis can come from a sudden increase in activity levels (i.e., walking or running much longer distances) or from sports-related activities that require a lot of running and jumping. Other causes may include a lot of standing, walking or running on hard surfaces, not wearing shoes that properly support your foot type, or being overweight.

    It’s estimated plantar fasciitis affects about 10 percent of Americans at some point in their lives, with most being diagnosed after the age of 40.

    Plantar fasciitis pain may come and go for some without treatment, but we never recommend ignoring pain as this is your body’s way of telling you something’s wrong. Fortunately, there are some things you can do at home to help relieve the discomfort and hopefully keep the condition from getting worse.

    Tips for the at-home management of plantar fasciitis include:

    Rest: As with any overuse injury, rest is a key component of recovery. Decrease your distances when walking or running, and try to avoid hard surfaces.

    Stretching: Stretch the soles of your feet by gently pulling your big toe back toward your ankle and holding for 10 seconds at a time. Also, wrap a towel around the ball of your foot and, from a seated position with your heel to the floor, slowly pull your toes toward you, stretching the arch of your foot. As tight calves may also make you more susceptible to plantar fasciitis, regular calf stretches are a must.

    Massage: A tennis ball can do wonders as a massaging tool. Roll a tennis ball under the sole of your foot, applying weight as comfort allows. Rolling your foot over a frozen plastic water bottle can also work, with the added benefit of helping decrease pain and inflammation.

    Foot Support: When standing for long periods of time, stand on a thick, padded mat. And don’t take your shoes for granted. Make sure they offer good arch support and that you replace them immediately as the shock absorption begins to wear down.

    If pain persists, however, a more individualized treatment plan from a physical therapist is likely needed. A physical therapist can pinpoint the most likely triggers of your plantar fasciitis pain, then customize a treatment regimen that may include flexibility and strength exercises, footwear recommendations and/or custom shoe inserts, and the possible use of taping or splints to help maintain optimal ankle and toe positions.

  6. Did You Know? National Physical Therapy Month Edition

    October is National Physical Therapy Month, and physical therapists everywhere are jumping at the opportunity to remind people about the important role improved and restored movement has on improving society.

    “Pain-free movement is crucial to your quality of daily life, your ability to earn a living, your ability to pursue your favorite leisure activities, and so much more,” states Move Forward, the official consumer information site of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA).

    Thankfully, more than 204,000 physical therapists are currently licensed in the U.S., all practicing under a single vision statement: transforming society by optimizing movement to improve the human experience.

    According to the APTA, physical therapists are highly educated, licensed health care professionals who exist to help patients reduce pain and improve or restore mobility – in many cases without the need for expensive surgery and often reducing the need for long-term use of prescription drugs.

    “Human health and quality of life depend on the ability to move skillfully and efficiently,” the APTA states in a document titled The Human Movement System. “As a human movement system practitioner, the [physical therapist] has the expertise to examine, diagnose and treat all elements of this system to produce a meaningful change in an individual’s movement behavior and physical function.

    “The PT uses his or her integrative knowledge to establish a plan of care to maximize physical performance of people of all ages, pathologies or levels of physical function.”

    This, of course, includes post-injury/surgical rehabilitation, but physical therapy is much more than that. In fact, physical therapists are specially trained and licensed to improve people’s lives through the treatment of a number of ailments you may not have previously suspected, such as:

    Headaches: Following a thorough evaluation, a physical therapist (PT) can treat chronic tension-type headaches, the most common primary headache disorder, according to the World Health Organization. A PT can identify the cause of such headaches (e.g., muscle tension, joint dysfunction in the neck/jaw, poor posture or stress) and work to improve mobility, strength, posture, and daily work/office routines.

    Pre-Natal/Post-Partum Care: Physical therapists can offer relief for expecting mothers experiencing pain and discomfort in the back, hips and legs through treatment and exercise. After delivery, physical therapy is effective in treating back and pelvic pain while helping new moms strengthen their bodies for the rigors of motherhood.

    Balance, Dizziness & Vertigo: Physical therapists can assess a person’s balance and risk of fall, then provide treatment (e.g., strength training, flexibility or range of motion exercises, for instance) to help improve balance. Many physical therapists are also specially trained to treat positional vertigo, which can often be successfully treated in a single visit.

    Athletic Enhancement: From weekend warriors to elite athletes, physical therapists work with our most active to help them move better, train better and realize their greatest potential as competitors. PTs can provide movement analyses, establish a better training regimen, and assist with equipment selection and adjustments (e.g., shoe orthotics, for instance, or bike fitting).

    In addition, the APTA notes that most PT clients in the U.S. don’t need a physician’s referral in order directly access physical therapy services – unless, of course, such referral is required in order to bill insurance. Contact your physical therapist to learn more.

     

    RESOURCES:

    APTA: Physical Therapist Practice and The Human Movement
    http://www.apta.org/MovementSystem/

    APTA: Vision Statement for the Physical Therapy Professional & Guiding Principles to Achieve the Vision
    http://www.apta.org/Vision/

    APTA: Who Are Physical Therapists?
    http://www.apta.org/AboutPTs/

    Move Forward: Benefits of Physical Therapy
    http://www.moveforwardpt.com/Benefits/Default.aspx#.VgxhehFVhBc

    APTA: PT Careers Overview
    http://www.apta.org/PTCareers/Overview/

    Lehigh Valley Health Network: 10 Ways Physical Therapy Can Help
    http://www.lvhn.org/wellness_resources/wellness_articles/healthy_living/10_ways_physical_therapy_can_help

    Move Forward: Physical Therapist’s Guide to Headaches
    http://www.moveforwardpt.com/symptomsconditionsdetail.aspx?cid=fd8a18c8-1893-4dd3-9f00-b6e49cad5005#.VfxCyBFVhBc

    Move Forward: Benefits of Physical Therapy
    http://www.moveforwardpt.com/Benefits/Default.aspx#.VgrJARFVhBc

    World Health Organization: Headache disorders
    http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs277/en/

     

Smokey Point

Hours:
Monday-Friday: 7:00 am – 1:00pm; 2:00pm – 6:00pm

Services

  • Physical Therapy services
  • Aquatic Therapy
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Medicine
  • Concussion Rehabilitation
  • Gait Analysis

 

  • Balance Rehabilitation
  • Work Injury Management
  • TMJ Treatment
  • Massage Therapy
  • Motor Vehicle Accident Rehabilitation
  • BPPV Treatment

Mark Roberts, DPT, COMT
Clinic Director

Why I’m a Physical Therapist: I’ve always been mechanically inclined and enjoy helping people. Physical therapy allows me to help others while doing what I love.
Education Commitment: I am interested in continuing to develop my manual therapy skills and obtain a certification in orthopedic manual therapy (COMT).
Personal Interests: I love being in the mountains either exploring trails on my mountain bike or chasing powder on my snowboard.
Educational Background: I attended Western Washington University in Bellingham and earned a B.S. in Kinesiology. After taking a year off to work as a physical therapist aide, I attended Physical Therapy school at Regis University in Denver, Colorado.

Heather Wharton, PT, DPT

Why I’m a Physical Therapist: I am passionate about helping others regain or improve their physical capabilities to return to doing the activities they enjoy.
Continuing Education Commitment: I am committed to lifelong learning with a special interest in manual therapy. I am certified in myofascial decompression with the use of negative pressure and am working towards a Certification in Orthopedic Manual Therapy through the Ola Grismby Institute.
Personal Interests: I love all things sports related and I am a Notre Dame fanatic. I like to golf, hike, paddle board, and travel the world in my free time.
Educational Background: I received a B.A. in Biology at Drury University in 2014 and a Doctorate of Physical Therapy degree from Southwest Baptist University in 2017.

John Richter, Massage Therapist

Why I’m a Massage Therapist: I discovered massage therapy after running a sub 2:30 marathon. Massage has many benefits for all different needs.
Continuing Education Commitment: I have extensive experience working with patients recovering from orthopedic injuries, spinal cord injuries and lymphedema. I also enjoy working with student athletes and older patients. I have worked as a Physical Therapy Aide in both inpatient and outpatient environments since 1990.
Personal Interests: I am a cancer survivor. I have competed at the national level as a marathon runner, achieving sub 2 hour and 30-minute times. I am also proud to be a father of two adult children, J. Michael and Alyssa.
Educational Background: I graduated from the Seattle Massage School in 1993. From 1993 to 2006 I taught Kinesiology at Ashmead College.

Patty Boettcher, PTA

Why I’m a Physical Therapist Assistant: I met a therapist when I was in high school and he was so dynamic and compassionate about his career, that I volunteered in his clinic and the rest is history.
Continuing Education Commitment: I have taken a wide variety of classes over the years to expand my knowledge base and usually with a certain patient in mind.
Personal Interests: I have a 30acre farm, 2 grown children, no grandchildren and am president of the board at my local museum.
Educational Background: I graduated from the PTA program at Green River Community College in 1980.

Justin Hicks, PTA

Why I’m a Physical Therapist Assistant: Growing up watching and playing sports, I have always been fascinated by how the human body works. I also just enjoy people. Physical therapy allows me to pursue my passion while helping those return to life and function.
Continuing Education Commitment: I feel it’s important to never settle and stop learning. I try to learn new ways to do things from each therapist I work with. I hope to get the opportunity to explore Neurokinetic Therapy and the Fascial Distortion Model in the near future.
Personal Interests: I commit majority of my free time raising 3 boys along side my wife, Rachel. We try to be active with water activities, hikes, and trips to the park especially when the weather is good. When I can escape, I like to play golf, catch a game, bbq, and hang with some friends.
Educational Background: I grew up locally and attended high school in Lake Stevens. I earned a BS in Kinesiology from Washington State University. Go Cougs!! I graduated from the Physical Therapist Assistant program at Whatcom CC in Bellingham in 2009.

Leisha Briggs, PT Aide

Heather Davidson, PSR

Ana Linares, PSR

Silver Lake

Hours:
Monday, Wednesday: 6:30am – 7:00pm
Tuesday, Thursday: 7:00am – 7:00pm
Friday: 6:30am – 6:00pm

Services

  • Physical Therapy services
  • Hand Therapy
  • Custom Hand Splints & Orthotics
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Medicine
  • Custom Orthotics & Gait Analysis
 

  • Balance Rehabilitation
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Work Injury Management
  • TMJ Treatment
  • Headaches/Chronic Pain

Jeff Kriegel, DPT, CMPT, CSCS, Clinic Director

Jeff has been practicing physical therapy with Cascade Rehab since graduating from the University of Puget Sound in 2000. Over the last 17 years, he has obtained his Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist credential thru the NSCA and his Certified Manual Physical Therapist designation thru the North American Institute of Orthopedic Manual Therapy. Jeff is a clinical instructor, assisting in the education process for many new therapists and exercise physiologists over the years. He has volunteered his time for event coverage with Mariner and Cascade High Schools. He also served as the team physical therapist for the Everett Aquasox prior the birth of his two children. Jeff has a long history of treating spine and extremity injuries in the Everett area. He believes in empowering patients through education on their condition and the rehabilitation process to ensure the best outcomes. In his spare time, Jeff enjoys woodworking, watching/coaching his two girl’s sports, camping and hiking with the whole family, and rooting on the Huskies!

Janet Chen Fowler, MPT, CMPT

Janet has been practicing physical therapy for over 19 years in an outpatient orthopedic setting, the last 16 years at Cascade Rehab. She graduated from the Eastern Washington University with a Master’s Degree in physical therapy and went on to obtain certifications in manual therapy (through the North American Institute of Manual Therapy), vestibular rehabilitation (through the Herdman Certification Program from Emory University), and Craniosacral Therapy (through Bastyr University). Janet’s philosophy in the treatment of her clients is looking at the whole person and finding/treating the part(s) of the body driving the client’s dysfunction and/or pain. Janet is married and has two active boys in elementary school. Winston, the family’s mini schnauzer, has all of them well trained. She finds joy spending time with her family and friends, traveling, learning and experiencing new things. She also loves food.

David Cagle, DPT

Dave graduated from the University of Texas Medical Branch with a doctorate in physical therapy in 2018 and began practice at Cascade Rehab in Silver Lake. A native of Texas, Dave moved to Washington to escape the heat and explore the beauty of the PNW. Dave served in the US Army as a Special Forces Medical Sergeant, receiving numerous awards for his service during overseas operations while gaining a wealth of experience in healthcare. An undergraduate degree in biochemistry from the University of Texas at Austin provided Dave with a solid foundation in scientific research and fuels his desire to provide evidence-based care to his patients. Current areas of interest include sports rehab, foot and ankle rehab, and neurological rehab. Dave has completed the LSVT BIG program for Parkinson’s treatment and is certified as an LSVT BIG provider. Dave is currently working to earn his COMT (certified orthopedic manual therapist) certification through the Ola Grimsby Institute. Outside of work, Dave can be found skiing the deeps, backpacking the North Cascades, or hunting for DB Cooper. 

Christy Green, OTR/L, CHT

Christy grew up in the Puget Sound area and received her bachelors of science in occupational therapy from The University of Puget Sound in 2000. She started her occupational therapy career in the United States Army, serving on active duty for four years at Fort Jackson, South Carolina. While in the Army, she earned a special designation as an Upper Extremity Neuromusculoskeletal Evaluator. She then relocated to Washington State and has been working at Cascade Rehabilitation since 2004. Christy earned the distinguished designation as a Certified Hand Therapist in 2007. Since then she has continued to advance her clinical skills by attending advanced hand training seminars and with regular review of current peer reviewed literature. She is an active member of the American Society of Hand Therapists. In addition to spending time with her husband and three children, Christy enjoys singing with her church’s worship team and with the Mill Creek Chorale.

Andrew Amirr, PTA

Andrew has been a Physical Therapist Assistant since 2010. Including five years at Cascade Rehabilitation in Silver Lake. He graduated from Pima Medical Institute’s PTA program in 2009 and went on to obtain certifications in Applied Functional Science and Kinesio Taping, to name a few. In his spare time, Andrew is a self-proclaimed “gym rat,” with a passion for the sport of bodybuilding, but his absolute favorite thing to do is spending time with his wife and two children.

Linda Shuger, LMP

Graduated from Seattle Massage School and became licensed in 1994. I’ve been with Cascade Rehab at their Colby, Harbour Pt., and Silverlake locations since 1998. Started in the PT department and soon moved over to OT/Hand Therapy full time. OT allowed me to use my massage skills daily which I am thankful for and enjoy very much. I’ve worked with the best hand therapists over the years and I’ve learned so much from all of them! My non-work time is dedicated to my family, my 2 cats Joey and Gabby, animal activism, music, whale watching, beach time at Picnic Pt., and naps.

Devin Jacques, MS, OTR/L, CHT

Devin Jacques was born and raised in Phoenix, Arizona. He received his Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology from Arizona State University in 2008. He then attended occupational therapy school at Midwestern University in Glendale, Arizona where he received his Master’s in Occupational Therapy in 2011. It was at Midwestern University where Devin began to develop his passion for treating the upper extremity. Devin has worked as an occupational therapist for the last 7 years in Phoenix, Arizona, Green Bay, Wisconsin, and most recently in Denver, Colorado. He has spent the last 6 years as a hand therapist and received his CHT (Certified Hand Therapist) certification from the Hand Therapy Certification Commission in November 2017. He is an active member of the American Society of Hand Therapists (ASHT) as well. Devin specializes in the treatment of various orthopedic conditions of the hand, wrist, elbow, and shoulder including custom orthotic fabrication for the hand, wrist and elbow. He provides current evidence-based treatments, focusing on providing quality and individualized treatments for his patients. Devin continues to grow as a hand therapist working towards his certification in orthopedic manual therapy (COMT) for the upper extremity. Devin has recently moved from Denver, CO to Whidbey Island with his wife Jenna to be closer to family and to reap all the benefits of living in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. When he is not at work, Devin loves to ski, hike, and golf as well as spend time with his wife and their boxer, Charles.

Denise Blackwell, PT

Denise has been practicing physical therapy for over 25 years in an outpatient orthopedic setting in Everett. She graduated from Loma Linda University in physical therapy in 1988 and moved to the NW with her husband and daughters in 1992. She enjoys working with all patients  to achieve their goals for functional rehabilitation using manual therapy and exercise prescription. She loves being outside with her family and dog hiking and biking.

Maria Green, LMP

Bio Coming Soon.

 

 

 

 

Andrea Vos, PTA

During Andrea’s career as a dancer and fitness instructor, she became increasingly interested in helping people attain and improve wellness through movement and natural means. Her experience as a Certified Personal Trainer and as a Chiropractic Assistant provided a great introduction, but never fully addressed the complete picture of why someone is having pain or experiencing difficulty executing a movement properly and then how to solve this more comprehensively. She decided to go back to school and become a Physical Therapist Assistant in order to work hands-on with people as individuals, each with their unique needs and goals, and make a positive impact by teaching them how to allow their bodies to heal themselves. She is fortunate to be a part of the team at Cascade – Silver Lake and to work part-time at our sister clinic, Summit in Snohomish, as she is regularly exposed to new and different ideas and techniques from a variety of experienced Physical Therapists. Additionally, she enjoys the opportunities to advance and expand her skills both as a PTA and a Group Fitness Instructor with continuing education courses, such as Muscle Energy Technique, PNF, and different fitness formats. Outside of the clinic, she specializes in teaching Barre fitness classes which are a huge complement to the principles of rehab exercise and provide a safe environment for students to learn stability and core control as well as sculpt their figures. In her spare time, she enjoys taking and teaching dance classes, “dinking”, reading, bike riding, hiking, and traveling both internationally and exploring the beautiful PACNW. After relocating to Seattle from Chicago in 2011 with her amazing fiancée, Mohamed, she is happy that her immediate family is now all within reasonable driving distance from each other for the first time in many years, including her step-children, whom are best described as “awesome”.

 

 

 

 

Mount Vernon

Hours:
Monday-Friday: 7:00am-6:00pm

Services

  • Physical Therapy services
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Medicine
  • Custom Orthotics & Gait Analysis
 

  • Balance Rehabilitation
  • Work Injury Management
  • TMJ Treatment
  • Headaches

Dave Cagle, PT, DPT, Clinic Director

Dave started practice at Cascade Rehabilitation in 2018 after graduating from the University of Texas Medical Branch with a doctorate in physical therapy. A native of Texas, Dave moved to Washington to escape the heat and explore the beauty of the PNW. Dave served in the US Army as a Special Forces Medical Sergeant, receiving numerous awards for his service during overseas operations while gaining a wealth of experience in healthcare. An undergraduate degree in biochemistry from the University of Texas at Austin provided Dave with a solid foundation in scientific research and fuels his desire to provide evidence-based care to his patients. Current areas of interest include sports rehab, vestibular rehab, and foot and ankle rehab. Dave is currently working to earn certifications in manual therapy and vestibular therapy. Outside of work, Dave can be found skiing the steeps, backpacking the North Cascades, or hunting for DB Cooper.

Jordan Heisler, PTA

Jordan graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Kinesiology and Minor in Media Analysis from Arizona State University in 2011. He then obtained his Physical Therapist Assistant degree from Whatcom Community College in 2016. Jordan was introduced to the field of physical therapy for the first time as a high school athlete. Even though it wasn’t always fun, the overall experience was quite positive which is what prompted him to pursue a career path as a PTA. Jordan loves this field of work because he gets to interact and build rapport with a very diverse population. He believes the best part of his job is being involved in a patient’s road to recovery (working closely with each person to help maximize their potential) so that they can achieve both their short and long-term goals. He has been a big Seattle sports fan since childhood. In addition to his passion for the Seahawks and Mariners, Jordan is a big advocate of bringing the Sonics back to Seattle. He also loves to travel – whether it’s visiting family in different parts of the country or flying to watch the Seahawks play on the road. In his spare time, you can find Jordan in the kitchen cooking, barbecuing outside on the grill, shooting hoops, attending sporting events, playing Madden on Xbox, or hanging out with friends.

 

Harbour Pointe

Hours:
Monday, Wednesday: 7:00am-6:00pm
Tuesday, Thursday: 6:30am-7:00pm
Friday: 7:00am-5:00pm

Services

  • Physical Therapy services
  • Hand Therapy
  • Custom Hand Splints & Orthotics
  • Spine Rehabilitation and Extremities
  • Sports Medicine
  • Running Rehabilitation Program
 

  • Balance Rehabilitation
  • Work Injury Management
  • TMJ Treatment
  • Headaches
  • Chronic/Persistent pain

Dale Hoistad, PT, CMPT, CHP, FAAOMPT, Clinic Director

Dale has been practicing in the Mukilteo/Everett area for 30 years. He has completed 3 long-term post graduate certifications beginning with a year-long Fellowship Residency in the San Francisco Bay Area. He then went on to complete a long-term Hellerwork Training program which includes manual treatment of the myofascial system. The latest certification was a Level III proficiency through The North American Institute of Manual Therapy and he’s currently focusing on additional courses from the Institute of Physical Art. Dale is a Lifetime Fellow in the American Academy of Manual Physical Therapy. In his free time, he enjoys tennis, bicycling, hiking/backpacking and trying to keep up with his wife and teenage children.

Robert C. Rinke, PT, DC, FAAOMPT

Robert practices as a physical therapist and Doctor of Chiropractic. He received his Masters degree in Physical Therapy from the University of Southern California and Doctorate in Chiropractic from Palmer College of Chiropractic-West. He also earned a Bachelors degree in Sociology and a Masters degree in Kinesiology from the University of Washington. Dr. Rinke’s training includes the six-month Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) residency at Kaiser Foundation Rehabilitation Center, Vallejo, CA, the Folsom Physical Therapy Orthopedic Manual Therapy (OMT) Residency, Folsom, CA, and Palmer College of Chiropractic-West, San Jose, CA. In 1991 Dr. Rinke passed the final examination in the Kaltenborn-Evjenth Nordic System for Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapist (OMPT) according to the International Federation of Orthopedic Manipulative Therapists (IFOMT) standards. In 1994 Dr. Rinke was named one of the first full Fellows in the American Academy of Orthopedic Manual Physical Therapists (FAAOMPT) and is now a lifetime Fellow. Dr. Rinke has taught short courses in PNF and OMT since 1986.

Natalie B. Lew, PT

Natalie earned her physical therapy degree at California State University, Northridge in 1981. Ms. Lew completed the three-month residency program in Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) at Kaiser Foundation Rehabilitation in Vallejo, CA in 1982 and emphasized treating neurological rehab patients early in her career. In 1984 she became interested in Orthopedic Manual Therapy (OMT) and moved to the Sacramento, CA area to further her training. Ms. Lew successfully completed the year-long Folsom Physical Therapy Orthopedic Manual Therapy (OMT) Program in 1987, and repeated it in residency in 1988 while working in the area as Orthopedic Clinical Specialist at an area hospital outpatient clinic. She has taught short courses in PNF since 1984, and OMT since 1990.

Devin Jacques, MS, OTR/L, CHT

Devin Jacques was born and raised in Phoenix, Arizona. He received his Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology from Arizona State University in 2008. He then attended occupational therapy school at Midwestern University in Glendale, Arizona where he received his Master’s in Occupational Therapy in 2011. It was at Midwestern University where Devin began to develop his passion for treating the upper extremity. Devin has worked as an occupational therapist for the last 7 years in Phoenix, Arizona, Green Bay, Wisconsin, and most recently in Denver, Colorado. He has spent the last 6 years as a hand therapist and received his CHT (Certified Hand Therapist) certification from the Hand Therapy Certification Commission in November 2017. He is an active member of the American Society of Hand Therapists (ASHT) as well. Devin specializes in the treatment of various orthopedic conditions of the hand, wrist, elbow, and shoulder including custom orthotic fabrication for the hand, wrist and elbow. He provides current evidence-based treatments, focusing on providing quality and individualized treatments for his patients. Devin continues to grow as a hand therapist working towards his certification in orthopedic manual therapy (COMT) for the upper extremity. Devin has recently moved from Denver, CO to Whidbey Island with his wife Jenna to be closer to family and to reap all the benefits of living in the beautiful Pacific Northwest. When he is not at work, Devin loves to ski, hike, and golf as well as spend time with his wife and their boxer, Charles.

Elizabeth Peterson, DPT

Liz has been with Cascade since graduating from the University of Puget Sound with a doctorate in physical therapy. She enjoys working with patients of all backgrounds, using manual therapy and exercise prescription to help them return to the activities that matter most to them. Prior to becoming a physical therapist she was a cycling coach, and she enjoys teaching and empowering patients to reach their personal goals. She is currently pursuing a certification in Orthopedic Manual Therapy. In her spare time she is an avid runner, cyclist, and climber.

Hailey Garcia, PTA

Hailey has been practicing as a Physical Therapist Assistant since 2014 after graduating Pima Medical Institute’s Physical Therapist Assistant program in Seattle, WA. Since graduation she has spent her time practicing in an outpatient orthopedic setting and continuing her education through mentorship programs. In 2017 she became a Certified Kinesio Taping Practitioner. She was also recognized through the APTA for attaining the PTA Advanced Proficiency of Orthopedics Certification after a year of course work, testing and clinical mentorship. When not at work Hailey spends time with her husband and son enjoying all that the beautiful PNW has to offer.

 

Everett/Broadway

Hours:
Monday-Friday: 7:00am- 6:00pm

Services

  • Physical Therapy Services
  • Aquatic Therapy
  • Spine Rehabilitation
  • Sports Medicine
  • Hellerwork
  • Custom Orthotics & Gait Analysis
 

  • Balance Rehabilitation
  • Vestibular Rehabilitation
  • Work Injury Management
  • TMJ Treatment
  • Headaches
  • Chronic Pain

Nick Carter, PT, DPT, Clinic Director

Why I’m a Physical Therapist: I knew early on I wanted to be a physical therapist when I began having chronic ankle sprains and started going to PT myself. MY PT made a big impact on my life and helped me to gain stability and strength that propelled me to greater heights in my sports. The ability to impact people’s lives in a positive way and allow them to achieve their personal goals has continued to push me to be a better physical therapist.
Continuing Education Commitment: My continuing education interests include completing a fellowship in manual therapy. I am also pursuing certification in additional spinal techniques for the state of Washington. I believe in continuously expanding my knowledge to include new research, and to prevent an atrophied mind. The stagnant mind gets left behind.
Personal Interests: My personal interests are varied including playing and watching sports, reading, hiking, swimming, hunting, fishing, television, and most importantly, spending time with friends and family.
Educational Background: I graduated from WSU Vancouver with honors and earned a B.S. in Biology. I then completed my DPT at Eastern Washington University.

Patrick McKilligan, PT

Patrick is originally from Vancouver, Canada. He received his B.S. from University of Puget Sound. He specializes in treating the spine, low back, sacroiliac joints and the neck. Patrick is a dedicated runner and enjoys gardening.

 

Kirsti Griffin, PT

Kirsti is originally from Portland, Oregon and she obtained her Physical Therapy Degree from the University of Washington. She has been practicing Physical Therapy in an Everett orthopedic outpatient clinic for over 25 years. Kirsti enjoys working with all patients and feels fortunate to learn something new on a daily basis. She strives to help her patients optimize their functional rehabilitation potential through her manual skills and exercise prescription. She has co-developed Cascade’s aquatic therapy program which continues to grow and serve her diverse patient population. Away from the clinic, she can be found outside. She loves to run and walk through the neighborhood, cheer for her daughters and enjoy the Pacific Northwest waters boating with her husband.

Rebekah Reed, PTA, ATRIC

Bekah was born and raised in the Pacific Northwest. She obtained her Associates degree from PIMA Medical Institute in Seattle. She has since been certified in Aquatic Therapy. She is passionate about helping patients achieve their goals in an aquatic setting. In her spare time Bekah enjoys kayaking and spending time with her husband and 1-year old son.

Lauren Cronin, PT

Lauren is a native of the Seattle area. She earned her BA at the University of Washington and subsequently completed her DPT at Eastern Washington University in Spokane. Lauren enjoys working with patients of all backgrounds and injury types in the orthopedic setting and is currently working towards her Orthopedic Manual Therapist certification. In her spare time, Lauren enjoys distance running, downhill skiing, and hiking.

Kylee Hilde, PTA

Kylee grew up in Lake Stevens and graduated from Western Washington University with her bachelors of science in Kinesiology and a minor in sports psychology. She went on to further her education to become a physical therapist assistant from Lake Washington Institute of Technology. Kylee grew up laying volleyball and tennis and is now assistant coaching high school volleyball. In her spare time she enjoys traveling the United States with her fiance and has made it her personal goal to see all 50 states. Additionally, to stay active, she makes time for hiking and biking on local trails. She is extremely passionate about health and well being and incorporates that passion into her practice as a physical therapist assistant.